Borovick Fabrics

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Hints & FAQs

Q  What fabrics can I dye?

 

A  Cotton, linen and viscose will dye to the full shade.

   Polyester/cotton & polyester/viscose mixes (aka 'polyester mixes') will result in lighter shades.

   Wool and silk can be dyed with DYLON Hand Fabric Dye.

   Polyester, Nylon and other synthetics can not be dyed.

   Do not machine dye wool, silk, polyester, acrylic, nylon & fabric with special finishes e.g. ‘dry clean only'.

 

   If you're not sure whether a fabric is suitable for dyeing give DYLON's friendly experts a call on 01737 742020 (in UK).

 

 

Q  Can I dye denim?

 

A  Yes, Machine Fabric Dye or Wash & Dye are best for dyeing denim however you will loose the light dark contrast

   typically associated with denim.

 

 

Q  Can I dye faded items?

 

A  Yes but you should use DYLON Pre-Dye first to remove the colour from the fabric and ensure that you get an even colour.

 

 

Q  Why do I need to use salt?

 

A  You need to use salt with all DYLON dyes except Wash & Dye (it's already in Wash & Dye) because it opens up the pores    

   of the fabric and allows the dye to be absorbed.

 

 

DYLON MACHINE DYE HINTS:

 

• Use in front loading automatic washing machines. Do not use in launderette machines.

 

• Don’t dye more than half machine’s maximum load to avoid crowding which will give patchy results.

 

• Don’t use more than five packs of dye at once.

 

• Dyeing may not cover stains, faded areas or bleach marks (bleach can harm the fabric).

 

• Should any dye be left in machine after dyeing, add cup of bleach to drum, add detergent as usual and

  run machine empty on 40°C cycle.

 

• After dyeing, wash separately or with similar colours for first two washes to remove any excess dye.

 

• Polyester stitching will not dye.

 

• You can change one strong colour to another (or dye it to a lighter shade) by using DYLON PRE-DYE which

  lightens before you dye, ready for colour change.

 

• Otherwise, colour mixing rules apply, e.g. blue dye on red fabric gives purple.

 

• Patterned fabric will often still show through.